Mondays And RA

180px-Galileo_moon_phases

Galileo’s 1616 drawings of the Moon and its phases. Monday is named after the Moon in many languages.

In general, Rheumatoid Arthritis Guy likes Monday mornings. These have always represented a new start, a time when my batteries were recharged from the weekend and I was ready to blast through the coming work week.

As a kid I anxiously looked forward to the arrival of Mondays. (I loved going to school, as I found weekends and vacations to be boring.) As an adult, even though I had a job here and there which I did not particularly enjoy, getting back into the work routine as a designer was always something to look for – as long as I focused on the design and not on the usual office games and power plays.

This Monday morning, though, I find myself in a very different position. I feel like it’s 5:01pm on a Friday afternoon, and I just finished the most grueling 80 hour work week. Rheumatoid Arthritis is disrespectful in many different ways, one of the most obvious being that it does not care what day of the week it is, or what time of the day it is.

I used to be one of those RA-newbies who thought that as long as my rheumatoid arthritis limited itself to the weekends and evenings, that everything was going to be okay. Life could go on relatively interrupted.

Who was I kidding?

2:30pm on a Wednesday, when I used to cruise through hump day and glide to the end of the week. Flare. Wipeout.

6:00pm on a Saturday, while getting ready to go to that event that I’ve been looking forward to all week. Flare. No curtain call.

7:30am on a Monday, when I am supposed to feel somewhat refreshed and re-energized. Flare. On empty.

If you could schedule some time into your day planner for your rheumatoid arthritis, what days and times would you choose?

A few years back when I was on Methrotrexate my weekly dose was on Wednesday. (It must be my architecture background that has lead me to always think of Wednesday as the day that supports the entire week, sort of like the body of an airplane supporting the wings.) I was out of service for two days – the day I took my pills and the following day. I was not working on a contract at the time, so everything was okay.

But then I got a new gig. And I had to start traveling during the week. There was no way that I could maintain my same MTX schedule. So I swapped my dosage day to Saturday. And just like that, my weekends vanished. Missed birthday parties, missed baseball games, missed weekend bbq’s as I shivered in bed with nausea and headaches. (Back to RA newbie land, I continued to believe my rheumatologist as she told me the benefits I was experiencing…which to be precise, were none…were worth all of the side-effects that I had.)

During some of my worst flares, just knowing what day of the week it is helps me to maintain my orientation and keep my thoughts balanced. In the past, I used to lose all contact with what surrounded me, including what day of the week it was.

As I start this week, I am definitely a little (okay, a lot) beaten up by rheumatoid arthritis. But it’s Monday, the start of the new week, and as I have done in the past, I will welcome this day and remain cautiously optimistic about what the coming days might bring.

Stay tuned…for the next adventure of Rheumatoid Arthritis Guy!

1 Comment
1 comment
  1. Millicent says:

    Every day (& even every hour) is a new beginning. I hope that today will be the start of an exceptionally good week for you. Stay strong in your outlook!

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