My Decision To Not Use Medicines Right Now Is All About Personal Responsibility

RA Guy Adventures of RA Guy

DancersYears ago, the chronic eczema in my legs flared up. By this point, I knew the routine: schedule an appointment with my dermatologist, stop taking warm/hot baths, and start slathering the thick prescription eczema cream on my legs twice a day. This time around, however, the doctor threw in one more thing–a one month prescription of anti-allergy pills. Within 30 seconds of taking the first capsule, I immediately broke out in huge hives. This was the first time I had ever had such a pronounced allergic reaction to a  medication, and it was a very unpleasant–and scary–experience. I called the doctor, to let him that I was allergic to the pills and could not continue to take them as he had prescribed. “You can’t be allergic to these pills!” he almost shouted, “…they are anti-allergy pills! Continue taking the pills, and we will discuss during your follow-up visit.”

By the time I hung up the phone, I knew that there would be no follow-up visit.

Many of my readers know that at the moment, I am not using medicines to treat my rheumatoid arthritis. The reasons are numerous; the most important one being that I’ve cycled through all of the DMARDS (and various combinations thereof) multiple times, and they are no longer effective. In fact, I’ve reached a point where they actually seem to make things worse. All of the recent headlines about the effectiveness of triple DMARD therapy make me shudder…I can barely handle one, much less two, and now the general consensus that seems to be forming is that I’m supposed to take three?! Why not try some of the many newer biological treatments, you might be asking. Well, the reality is that for many people, including myself, such medicines are not affordable. (My entire extended stay in New York City earlier this year was all about–as an unemployed and uninsured U.S. citizen–trying to gain access to such meds, but we now know how horribly off the rails that adventure went. As I mentioned in a Facebook post earlier this week, even my financial assistance application that I submitted to Pfizer was denied for–get this–not providing proof of valid income!)

Despite all of the above (and despite the fact that every member of my health care team agrees that *not* using pharmaceutical medicines is the right choice for me right now), I continue to receive a slew of message that all have the same theme: how can I be so irresponsible? Some people seem almost frightened of my story, and tell me that I should stop talking about my current non-use of meds because I am encouraging other to be irresponsible, too. Others go so far as to almost cast a curse on me: any joint damage and disease progression that I experience in the future will be totally my fault, and that when I reach that point they will be sure to remind me that I am the only person to blame. (Just lovely, don’t you think?) And then there is the icing on the cake: could I please not be so anti-med? (I mean, come on, do these people even read what I write?!)

The truth is, I am not anti-med. I know that many people who live with rheumatoid arthritis are helped by such medications. (Heck, some of them helped me greatly in the past.) But I also know that for many people, these same medicines provide only temporary (to no) relief. I also know–firsthand–that for some people, these same medicines and their serious side effects can actually have a negative effect on a person’s health. We are all individuals and we are all different; where we end up on this spectrum of possible reactions to different medications is as unique as every other aspect of our personal selves.

Rarely a day goes by that I don’t see some blow-up on one social media site or another, over the “right way” of treating RA versus the “wrong way” of treating RA…and this saddens me. It saddens me because I think, it this really the best use of our time and energy? Don’t we all have the same goal, which is to find what works best for each one of us? Are we not all aware that what works for one person will often be completely different from what works for another person?

I receive messages all the time from people who tell me that they would *never* use the same treatment options that I use, but that they are happy that what I am doing is working for me…and I love love love these messages, because they remind me that, indeed, we are all in this together. They remind me that what is less important is for all of us to follow the same path, and that what is more important is for all of us to encourage and support one another on our beautiful and very different, hopeful and optimistic journeys.

Maureen, a reader of this blog, said it best with these words that she wrote earlier this year:

RA Guy writes a blog which is rare; instead of simply complaining, he provides an outlet for his emotions (and, therefore, his audience’s emotions).  Instead of rallying for/against treatment methods, he outlines his own experience.  Instead of silently bemoaning the way RA affects life, he provides a thoughtful and sometimes amusing perspective.  Instead of whining, he provides an intellectual approach to the challenges presented by a degenerative disease.  Instead of simply disengaging from the processes of treatment which have not helped him, he consistently (and publicly) searches for new alternatives.

To all of the people who continue to send me messages about how irresponsible I am for choosing my own treatment options, and who continue to predict untold doom and gloom in my future, I ask you kindly: please stop. Rheumatoid Arthritis Guy–the website, the Facebook page, and my personal email inbox–is not the place to attack other people’s personal treatment choices.

Stay tuned…for the next adventure of Rheumatoid Arthritis Guy!