How Do You Deal With The Fatigue?

RA Guy Community News

I’ve always been a huge fan of incorporating lifestyle measures, stress reduction, mindfulness-everything, gentle exercise (which I’ll admit, is the one item on this list where I can use the most improvement) and a healthy diet into my rheumatoid arthritis treatment plan. What is your experience with these issues and their relationship to fatigue? When my RA is most active, nothing seems to help but frequent naps…but on more mild days, I’ve found that all of the items mentioned above really help. Dr. Irwin Lim–a rheumatologist from Australia–asks the same, in the following post.

By Dr Irwin Lim, Rheumatologist

Rheumatoid arthritis, as well as the other inflammatory arthritides, are very much better treated in this day and age. And yet, it’s common to hear patients speak of tiredness or fatigue. Sometimes, this is profound and crippling.

When the disease is active, and I can detect objective signs of inflammation, the disease activity is an easy scapegoat. The more active the disease, the more systemic the symptoms. Fatigue will likely occur.

However, it’s much harder to explain when the disease seems well controlled. This is especially true if the disease is felt to be in remission.

If I cannot detect swelling of joints, and the patient denies joint symptoms, and the monitoring blood tests are all normal, how do we explain continuing fatigue?

I don’t have that answer.

Sometimes, it’s attributed to a side effect of the medications used. Sometimes, fibromyalgia is diagnosed as a coexisting problem and this is blamed.

I don’t think the answer lies in more medication.

Instead, I think lifestyle issues need to be addressed. Patients who have lived with a chronic disease, become deconditioned. Pain and stiffness reduces normal activity. Over time, muscles, tendons and ligaments become weak. In some, weight gain is an issue. Tolerance of effort reduces.

I believe it’s important to act early in the disease to encourage mindful eating and regular, targeted exercise to address these issues.

Randomised control data? I’m not sure that exists but it does seem to make common sense.

Medications can only improve one aspect of rheumatoid disease. Lifestyle measures remain an important, but unfortunately, often forgotten goal.

If you’re a patient, please share your experience with fatigue. If you’re a doctor, please share how you deal with this difficult symptom.

Dr. Irwin Lim obtained his fellowship with the Royal Australasian College of Physicians in 2003 in the specialty of Rheumatology. As director of BJC Health, Irwin developed the initial clinic in Parramatta to a multisite and multidisciplinary group. He strives to develop innovative, effective treatment solutions for patients suffering from chronic disease.

For more information, please visit www.bjchealth.com.au.