The Columbian: Arthritis Not stopping 20-Year-Old Nursing Student

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TheColumbian

Camas woman, who has lived with disorder since a tot, shows early, consistent care crucial

By Marissa Harshman, Columbian health reporter
Published: April 14, 2014, 6:00 AM

Twenty-year-old Kelly Slauson doesn’t know life without rheumatoid arthritis.

Diagnosed when she was just 18 months old, Slauson’s life as she knows it has always included medications, doctor’s appointments and joint stiffness.

“I thought every kid had to get shots on Friday nights and go to the doctor all the time,” said Slauson, who lives in Camas.

When Slauson was only about 7 or 8 months old, she started walking. But her parents later realized something wasn’t right.

Slauson would walk, but then, after napping, would wake up and revert to crawling. Or, if she did walk, it would be with a limp. Her pediatrician referred her to a rheumatologist at Seattle Children’s Hospital, where she was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disorder in which the immune system mistakenly attacks the body’s own tissue.

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Name My Cane!

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Cane

 

Thanks to the hundreds of people who suggested a name for my cane. (You can see all of the wonderful ideas here and here.) I have created a short list of my favorites, and would like you–my friends and supporters–to make the final decision!

Name-My-Cane-Results

Update: The winning name is Eileen-as in I lean! Thanks to everyone who took part in the Name My Cane contest–it was a lot of fun, and I now have a great story to share whenever someone asks why my cane is named Eileen.

Don’t forget, when it comes to stuff like having to use canes, crutches, or any other assistive device, be sure to have as much fun as you possible can!

Disability Studies: A New Normal

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The New York Times
by Cecilia Capuzzi Simon

Disability Studies

“The temporarily able-bodied, or TABs. That’s what disability activists call those who are not physically or mentally impaired. And they like to remind them that disability is a porous state; anyone can enter or leave at any time. Live long enough and you will almost certainly enter it.

That foreboding forecast is driving growth in disability studies, a field that didn’t even exist 20 years ago. The reasons are mainly demographic: as the population ages, the number of disabled will grow — by 21 percent between 2007 and 2030, according to the Census Bureau.

At the other end of the generational spectrum are those raised after the passage of the Americans With Disabilities Act in 1990. They are now in college or entering the work force. They are educated, perhaps without even realizing it, in the politics and realities of disability, having sat in the same classrooms in a more accessible society.”

Read More: www.nytimes.com/2013/11/03/...

Design Meets Disability: Diverse Meetings

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File0007“Disabled people do not all share a single experience, even of the same impairment; likewise, designers in the same discipline do not follow a single approach or hold the same values. Exciting new directions will arise from individual designers working with disabled individuals on particular briefs. This will produce different responses each time, complementary and even contradictory directions, but this richness is needed.” — Graham Pullin, Design Meets Disability