‘We Can Manage It’: Four Of Brian And Ranell Hanson’s Five Children Have Juvenile Arthritis

GRAFTON, N.D. — The family of Brian and Ranell Hanson is helping the most respected researchers in the nation find a cure for juvenile arthritis.

Four of the couple’s five children have the disease. It is thought that genetics may be a factor in its cause.

Medical records and blood samples from all seven members of the family have been sent by Altru Health System in Grand Forks to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Ohio for use in ongoing studies.

The family became involved because the children’s pediatric rheumatologist, Dr. Thomas Mason of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., “was puzzled by (the disease) popping up with all the kids,” said Ranell.

Read More: http://www.wdaz.com/event/article/id/15380/

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8 Rheumatoid Arthritis Myths

If you have rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a good first step is to learn as much as you can about your disease. In addition to understanding RA better, you may be surprised at how many myths exist. Many people still think that all arthritis is the same, or that only old people get RA. Debunking common myths will help you manage your condition and communicate your experience to your loved ones.
 
 
Read More: http://health-tools.health.msn.com/living-well-with-rheumatoid-arthritis/8-rheumatoid-arthritis-myths/#.UIrWVc2KpsA.facebook

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BBC News: 3D Printer To Help Foot Pain Sufferers

3D printers are being used to produce insoles and splints which could help millions of people with disabling foot and ankle conditions.

A team at Glasgow Caledonian University is “printing” devices which are more supportive and quicker to make.

Normally, making foot and ankle splints is a long and laborious process – a model of the foot is made, often from plaster, then plastic is moulded around it by hand.

This process can take anywhere up to six weeks, with patients waiting in considerable pain.

Prof Jim Woodburn, a specialist in foot problems at Glasgow Caledonian University, said: “Our goal is based on, for example, the Specsavers model so what we would like to do is ideally provide the patient with the device on the day.”

The team are using 3D printers to build foot and ankle supports with a new degree of precision.

Read More: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-20020600

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