The New York Times: Relax! You’ll Be More Productive

“By managing energy more skillfully, it’s possible to get more done, in less time, more sustainably.”

More and more of us find ourselves unable to juggle overwhelming demands and maintain a seemingly unsustainable pace. Paradoxically, the best way to get more done may be to spend more time doing less. A new and growing body of multidisciplinary research shows that strategic renewal — including daytime workouts, short afternoon naps, longer sleep hours, more time away from the office and longer, more frequent vacations — boosts productivity, job performance and, of course, health.

Read More: www.nytimes.com/2013/02/10/opinion/sunday/relax-youll-be-more-productive.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

This opinion piece is the perfect epilogue to my previous post, Is Less Really More?

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5 Tough Choices You Face When Chronically Ill Or In Pain

“Suffering from chronic pain or illness—or, as is often the case, both—can feel like a full-time job. One reason for this is that we must constantly assess and evaluate if we’re managing our health and our relationships as skillfully as possible. This ongoing decision making makes up a major part of the workload in this full-time job—a position we certainly never applied for!

Here are five tough choices we continually face. There aren’t easy answers to the issues they raise: that’s why they’re tough choices.”

Read More: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/turning-straw-gold/201301/5-tough-choices-you-face-when-chronically-ill-or-in-pain

Toni Bernhard is the author of the award-winning How to Be Sick: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide for the Chronically Ill and their Caregivers. Her new book, How to Wake Up: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide to Navigating Joy and Sorrow, will be published in September 2013.

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AdelaideNow: Cyclist Jack Bobridge Reveals Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain

AUSTRALIAN cycling star Jack Bobridge has revealed he suffers from rheumatoid arthritis but is adamant it will not stall his career.

The dual Olympian, 23, was diagnosed with the chronic condition in 2010 and requires weekly Methotrexate medication – also used to treat cancer patients.

At its worst before treatment began, Bobridge was at times unable to open a soft-drink bottle, struggled to put on his socks and was bed-ridden because of aching joints.

“Training was nearly unbearable and I was constantly sleeping because my body was so worn out,” he said.

Read More: http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/sport/cyclist-jack-bobridge-reveals-rheumatoid-arthritis-pain/story-fngr0c3d-1226549814678

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Research Study: Have You Overcome Chronic Pain?

Millions of people suffer from chronic pain every day. Some are able to overcome their pain problem; and we are interested in learning from these individuals in order to help others.

This study has been constructed to allow individuals to record their own stories of overcoming chronic pain. These stories will be studied to search for common themes and patterns. It is our hope these stories will help us develop future therapeutic regimens for chronic pain sufferers.

To be eligible to participate in the study, candidates should be at least 21 years old and have overcome a daily pain problem that lasted a year or longer. Interviews typically last from 30 to 60 minutes and can take place in person (Columbia, Missouri) or on the phone.

For more information, visit studychronicpain.com or call (573) 303-6886.

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‘We Can Manage It’: Four Of Brian And Ranell Hanson’s Five Children Have Juvenile Arthritis

GRAFTON, N.D. — The family of Brian and Ranell Hanson is helping the most respected researchers in the nation find a cure for juvenile arthritis.

Four of the couple’s five children have the disease. It is thought that genetics may be a factor in its cause.

Medical records and blood samples from all seven members of the family have been sent by Altru Health System in Grand Forks to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Ohio for use in ongoing studies.

The family became involved because the children’s pediatric rheumatologist, Dr. Thomas Mason of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., “was puzzled by (the disease) popping up with all the kids,” said Ranell.

Read More: http://www.wdaz.com/event/article/id/15380/

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