More Autoimmune Arthritis Blogs

Chronic Rants
Ms. Rants is a 30-something living in the area of Boston, Massachusetts. She is a daughter, sister, aunt, niece, granddaughter, and friend. She has had symptoms of chronic illnesses since a young age. After 11 years of symptoms, she received her first diagnosis in her 20s. Now, 9 years later, she completely has a handle on her health. Some days. Sort of. Mostly. Ok, sometimes.
Read More: http://chronicrants.com/

PhyzzEzee
Most people know me as Trish, or online as BitBat. I was diagnosed with Stills Disease, a juvenile form of arthritis, in 1949. I was in hospital for a year when I was eleven, resting basically as this was, back then, how the condition was treated. Before that I was encouraged to do ballet for seven years which was hard but probably helped in some ways. By the age of twenty-one I was suffering badly though and in great pain in one leg particularly. I ended up having a patelectomy (my knee cap removed) which then allowed me to get on with life again, although with limited flexibility in one knee.
Read More: http://phyzzezee.wordpress.com/

Is It Over Yet?
And I have hope. The greatest thing, next to those hugs that is, I have hope that things will only get….will only continue to get better. All the way around. So while I will have gloom and doom times, while I have times when I feel like warmed over camel poop, times when I want to put the headphones on and shriek into my pillow because the pain is so freaking horrible, there is always going to be, there always HAS to be that hope.
Read More: http://awholedivided.wordpress.com/

United Voices for Ankylosing Spondylitis
I personally was diagnosed with Ankylosing Spondylitis in October 2008, since then it has been an adventure to say the least. When I first found out I was actually relieved. It answered years of unexplained pain and actually made me feel like I wasn’t crazy. I had so many doctors through the years telling me my symptoms must have been in my head because they didn’t make sense. There were no visual signs or easy explanations of the pain I was going through so they would pass me off to the next doctor. I was constantly told the words so many AS patients have heard…”but you don’t look sick.” Like many people I never even heard of the disease until I was diagnosed. To hear you have a disease that will only get worse and has no cure can be extremely overwhelming not only physically, but emotionally. I felt very alone in the beginning and found that the multiple websites and support groups were vital to my own awareness of the disease. My hope for you is that this website will also help comfort you in knowing you are not alone.
Read More: http://www.unitedvas.com/

More Than RA
I am a child of God, wife and mother to 4 great kids. I happen to have RA and Fibro and am fighting to no let the disease define me. Love to quilt and craft. I love spending time with my church family,family and friends.
Read More: http://morethanra.blogspot.com/

Just As I Am
Well, the leg pain persisted. and persisted. and got more serious. In the mornings, he started shuffling like a 80-year-old-man. He wouldn’t climb into his carseat, and limped as he walked. He was exhausted, all the time. swollen lymph nodes, and intense belly pain. Our little man was hurting. If you’d like to know more about Grant’s journey with Systemic Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, you can follow these posts.
Read More: http://journey2guat.blogspot.com/p/grants-journey.html

More resources and blogs: www.rheumatoidarthritisguy.com/links/

2 Comments
2 comments
  1. Elisa S. says:

    Great list! Thank you for sharing it. I only recently started my Sjogren’s Style blog, and it’s amazing to have so many fantastic bloggers paving the way.

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